Venus Jupiter conjunction 2017: What is the Venus and Jupiter conjunction? | Science | News


What is the Venus Jupiter conjunction?

In the early hours of Monday morning, Venus and Jupiter will rise above the horizon, following an almost identical path. 

The result is expected to stun both amateur and professional astronomers alike.

The planets, which happen to be two of the brightest in the solar system, will be an astonishing 0.3 degrees apart in the night’s sky. 

This is equivalent to slightly more than half of the Moon’s diameter. 

The conjunction is made possible when Venus and Jupiter share the same east to west longitude in the sky, according to Space.com. 

Despite being some 416 million miles apart, for a brief period it will appear as if the two planets are orbiting the Sun side by side. 

The cosmological website Earthsky.com defines astronomical conjunctions as “the close approach of two or more solar system bodies or a close approach of a single solar system body with another object in the sky.”

The celestial phenomenon will take place about an hour before sunrise on Monday morning (November 13). 

In the UK, Venus will rise at 5.56am, with Jupiter following close behind at 5.58am.

Stargazers across Britain will be able to enjoy the conjunction for a good hour before light from the Sun obscures the view. 

How to watch the Venus and Jupiter conjunction

As with all astronomical events, the conjunction will be best viewed in a rural location away from any light pollution. 

The planets should be visible with the naked eye, but they will be close enough to fit within the sights of a telescope or pair of binoculars if you want a clearer view. 

Those hoping to watch the event are recommended to find a hill or high viewing point so the horizon is unobstructed. 

Venus and Jupiter will rise in the eastern sky, remaining close to the horizon. 



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