Nature


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Just like in humans, males across many mammal species don’t live as long as their female counterparts, and it’s not because they age differently, biologically speaking. “We’ve known for a long time that women generally live longer than men, but were surprised to find that the [difference] in lifespan between the sexes was even more
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Scientists have uncovered a splintered remnant of Earth’s continental crust from millions of years ago, embedded in the isolated wilderness of northern Canada. Baffin Island, located in between the Canadian mainland and Greenland, is a vast Arctic expanse covering over 500,000 square kilometres (almost 200,000 square miles), making it the fifth largest island in the
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A bacterial species that survives by ‘breathing’ rock has intrigued scientists for decades, even though the inner workings of its mysterious cellular respiration technique have remained far from clear.   Now, in a new study investigating the strange habits of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis, researchers have discovered that the microbe’s ability to ‘breathe’ by transporting
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A microscopic look at dinosaur cartilage from roughly 75 million years ago has turned up a cluster of exquisitely-preserved cells, and they just might contain something rather familiar.   Dusting off the skulls of two juvenile duck-billed dinosaurs (Hypacrosaurus stebingeri), shelved after their discovery in the 1980s, researchers noticed a bunch of tiny circular structures
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Our attempts to ‘seed’ clouds with extra snow or rain may actually be working, a new study suggests, although perhaps not quite as much as some had hoped. It may sound like something straight out of science fiction, but cloud seeding has been around since the 1940s. Despite the fact that this form of ‘weather
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Ancient canine craniums, discovered at a 28,500-year-old fossil site in Czechia, may represent one of the earliest stages of animal husbandry. Or, they could just be wolves. Today, all modern dogs (Canis familiaris) are descendants of Eurasian grey wolves (C. lupus), which were likely the first animals humans domesticated.   Over millennia, a gradual series
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A long, long time ago, the Indigenous Gunditjmara people – the traditional owners of lands in southwest Victoria, Australia – are said to have witnessed something truly remarkable.   An ancient oral tradition, passed down for countless generations, tells of how an ancestral creator-being transformed into the fiery volcano, Budj Bim. Almost 40,000 years later,