Month: February 2020

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Recent reports from scientists pursuing a new kind of nuclear fusion technology are encouraging, but we are still some distance away from the “holy grail of clean energy”. The technology developed by Heinrich Hora and his colleagues at the University of NSW uses powerful lasers to fuse together hydrogen and boron atoms, releasing high-energy particles
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The space station currently serves as a microgravity and space environment research laboratory for astronauts in space and was a joint project between NASA, Roscosmos, JAXA, ESA and CSA, and cost more than £150billion when it was launched in 1998. The space agencies carry out various experiments on board, as well as missions to and from the space station,
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The climate crisis poses an escalating threat to scientists everywhere and research of all kinds, scientists in Australia are now warning. The unprecedented wildfires sweeping their nation have been a “brutal wake-up call” to a simple fact: their work is “far from immune” to climate change.   In all its physical and practical glory, science
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Robert Weiter tweeted: “Coronavirus, locusts, species dying off in massive numbers, authoritarian leaders with bombs? “Climate change denied. Wars and rumours of wars. The ability to totally destroy our world. Book of Revelation, anyone?” Another Twitter user said: “Even in today’s age we can see what’s going on from the Book of Revelation in the
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Our attempts to ‘seed’ clouds with extra snow or rain may actually be working, a new study suggests, although perhaps not quite as much as some had hoped. It may sound like something straight out of science fiction, but cloud seeding has been around since the 1940s. Despite the fact that this form of ‘weather
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Scientists have used super high-speed cameras to capture the moment liquid droplets combine together, providing a unique, preternatural glimpse of fluid dynamics the human eye can’t observe on its own.   Using an experimental setup involving two synchronised high-speed cameras – one shooting from the side, and the other looking upwards (courtesy of a mirror
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A “doomsday vault” nestled deep in the Arctic received 60,000 new seed samples on Tuesday, including Prince Charles’ cowslips and Cherokee sacred corn, increasing stocks of the world’s agricultural bounty in case of global catastrophe.   Mounting concern over climate change and species loss is driving groups worldwide to add their seeds to the collection
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More than 80,000 people have been affected by the deadly virus now, with more than 2,600 fatalities recorded worldwide. The Chinese city of Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak, announced a policy of eased restrictions yesterday, allowing residents to leave in small groups. But, just three hours later, the decision was reversed, placing its nine million residents back
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Australia’s wildfires have destroyed more than a fifth of the country’s forests, making the blazes “globally unprecedented” following a years-long drought linked to climate change, researchers said Monday.   Climate scientists are currently examining data from the disaster, which destroyed swathes of southeastern Australia, to determine to what extent they can be attributed to rising
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A mysterious comet identified last year as only the second-ever known interstellar object in our Solar System inevitably prompted some big scientific questions. Chief among them: what, if anything, can it tell us about the hypothesised existence of extraterrestrial intelligence out there in space?   Well, if the object known as 2I/Borisov holds alien secrets,
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Antarctica is supposed to be an extremely cold place. The annual mean temperature of the snow-laden continent’s central area is -57 degrees Celsius (−70.6°F); even the coast averages around -10°C (14°F).   But on February 6, the weather station at Esperanza Base on the Antarctic Peninsula – the northernmost tip of the content – logged the hottest temperature
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Scientists have ‘puppeteered’ the movements of a jellyfish and made it even faster than the real thing. Taking artificial control with a microelectronic implant, researchers have increased the natural swimming speed of a live moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) by nearly threefold.   What’s more, they achieved this with only a little bit of external power