0 Comments
Nostradamus was a French astrologer, physician and foreseer, who is best known for his book “Les Propheties”, a collection of 942 poetic quatrains allegedly predicting future events published more than 500 years ago. In the years since the publication of his prophecies, Nostradamus has attracted many supporters, who credit him with having accurately predicted several major world events. Among some
0 Comments
The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle, is a loosely defined region in the North Atlantic Ocean, where a number of aircraft and ships have disappeared. The vicinity of the Bermuda Triangle is among the most heavily travelled shipping lanes in the world, with ships frequently crossing through it for ports in the Americas, Europe and the Caribbean islands. Popular culture has
0 Comments
“That is what NASA just did – the space agency’s probe just drove past it.” This bizarre image reportedly first surfaced in 2015, but Waring maintains NASA, however, never acknowledged it. Waring claims, without foundation, how the original source for the Mars photo “disappeared” from NASA’s Curiosity website. “I had to find this today to
0 Comments
Like an old time carnival show, the Paris Zoological Park’s latest attraction promises a shocking mystery. Dubbed ‘the blob’, the zoo is hoping to draw in the crowds by featuring a goo-like brainless creature with no mouth and hundreds of sexes, which displays an ability to survive – even thrive – when dissected.   While
0 Comments
If you’ve ever studied biology, you’ll be familiar with mitochondria – the organelles often referred to as the ‘powerhouse of the cell’. And you’ll probably be aware that they’re often compared to traditional AA batteries, with each organelle operating as a single unit.   But an important new study suggests they’re actually more like the
0 Comments
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is already re-configuring the world in conspicuous ways. Data drives our global digital ecosystem, and AI technologies reveal patterns in data. Smartphones, smart homes, and smart cities influence how we live and interact, and AI systems are increasingly involved in recruitment decisions, medical diagnoses, and judicial verdicts. Whether this scenario is utopian
0 Comments
Antarctic ice shelves are being destabilised by hidden, upside-down ‘rivers’ of warm water that course below the shelves and melt them from underneath, new research shows. Scientists have known about these basal channels in ice shelves for a number of years now, but the circumstances behind their formation weren’t well understood. Now, we’ve discovered more
0 Comments
In the sci-fi universe of “Star Trek”, spaceships with warp drives can zoom past the normally impenetrable limit of light speed, or about 186,282 miles per second (299,792 kilometers per second) in a vacuum.   This trouncing of theoretical physics makes reaching alien-rich planets across the galaxy seem like just a convenient TV-commercial-break-length trip away.
0 Comments
With the discovery of 20 more moons orbiting Saturn, the ringed planet has overtaken Jupiter as host to the most moons in the Solar system. Saturn now has 82 known moons, whereas Jupiter has a paltry 79.   Announced at the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Centre by a team of astronomers from the Carnegie
0 Comments
Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, described the horror of the authoritarian regime of Gilead. In this theocracy, self-preservation was the best people could hope for, being powerless to kick against the system.   But her sequel, The Testaments, raises the possibility that individuals, with suitable luck, bravery and cleverness, can fight back. But can
0 Comments
It’s been a busy week for astrophysicist Michel Mayor. On Tuesday, he won a Nobel Prize for his work detecting exoplanets. Then, on Wednesday, he crushed the dreams of anyone hoping to one day colonize those planets.   “If we are talking about exoplanets,” Mayor told Agence France-Presse when asked about off-world colonization, “things should be clear: we will not migrate
0 Comments
Unlike some creatures, humans can’t regenerate their limbs – but a new study suggests we do have a hidden ‘salamander-like’ ability to regrow cartilage in the body, a finding which could help treatment for joint injuries and even arthritis.   Using mass spectrometry techniques on 18 specimens, researchers were able to identify a mechanism by