Physics


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Polarons are important nanoscale phenomena: a transient configuration between electrons and atoms (known as quasiparticles) that exist for only trillionths of a second. These configurations have unique characteristics that can help us understand some of the mysterious behaviours of the materials they form within – and scientists have just observed them for the first time.  
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Metals and insulators are the yin and yang of physics, their respective material properties strictly dictated by their electrons’ mobility – metals should conduct electrons freely, while insulators keep them in place.    So when physicists from Princeton University in the US found a quantum quirk of metals bouncing around inside an insulating compound, they
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Scientists are edging closer to making a super-secure, super-fast quantum internet possible: they’ve now been able to ‘teleport’ high-fidelity quantum information over a total distance of 44 kilometres (27 miles).   Both data fidelity and transfer distance are crucial when it comes to building a real, working quantum internet, and making progress in either of
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A Canadian teenager from Fort McMurray, Alberta has won a major scientific competition for an electrifying YouTube video in which she brilliantly simplifies the complicated concept of quantum tunnelling.   Maryam Tsegaye, a 17-year-old student from École McTavish Public High School, took home top prize at the sixth annual Breakthrough Junior Challenge for the explainer,
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China successfully powered up its “artificial sun” nuclear fusion reactor for the first time, state media reported Friday, marking a great advance in the country’s nuclear power research capabilities.   The HL-2M Tokamak reactor is China’s largest and most advanced nuclear fusion experimental research device, and scientists hope that the device can potentially unlock a
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Wherever you have fluid, there you can also find vortex rings. Now, scientists have found vortex rings somewhere fascinating – inside a tiny pillar made of a magnetic material, the gadolinium-cobalt intermetallic compound GdCo2.   If you’ve seen smoke rings, or bubble rings under water, you’ve seen vortex rings: doughnut-shaped vortices that form when fluid flows back
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For something that largely exists in just two dimensions, graphene seems to be everywhere. The super-thin ‘wonder material’ is famous not only for its incredible strength, but also its unique, often surprising mix of thermal and electromagnetic properties.   In recent times, many of the strangest experimental discoveries in graphene research have been made when