Physics


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A Canadian teenager from Fort McMurray, Alberta has won a major scientific competition for an electrifying YouTube video in which she brilliantly simplifies the complicated concept of quantum tunnelling.   Maryam Tsegaye, a 17-year-old student from École McTavish Public High School, took home top prize at the sixth annual Breakthrough Junior Challenge for the explainer,
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China successfully powered up its “artificial sun” nuclear fusion reactor for the first time, state media reported Friday, marking a great advance in the country’s nuclear power research capabilities.   The HL-2M Tokamak reactor is China’s largest and most advanced nuclear fusion experimental research device, and scientists hope that the device can potentially unlock a
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Wherever you have fluid, there you can also find vortex rings. Now, scientists have found vortex rings somewhere fascinating – inside a tiny pillar made of a magnetic material, the gadolinium-cobalt intermetallic compound GdCo2.   If you’ve seen smoke rings, or bubble rings under water, you’ve seen vortex rings: doughnut-shaped vortices that form when fluid flows back
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For something that largely exists in just two dimensions, graphene seems to be everywhere. The super-thin ‘wonder material’ is famous not only for its incredible strength, but also its unique, often surprising mix of thermal and electromagnetic properties.   In recent times, many of the strangest experimental discoveries in graphene research have been made when
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Magnetism and electricity are linked together in many weird and wonderful ways throughout science, including the fascinating magnetoelectric effect noticeable in some crystals – where the electrical properties of a crystal can be influenced by a magnetic field, and vice versa.   Now things have gotten even weirder, because scientists have discovered a brand new
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Often it’s the most minute scientific measurements that are the most important, and researchers have developed a new, super-small device that’s capable of detecting magnetic fields even when they’re extremely faint.   The device, a new kind of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), is just 10 nanometres high, or around a thousandth of the thickness of a