Nature


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Antarctica’s king penguins emit such copious amounts of nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, via their faeces that researchers went a little “cuckoo” studying them, according to a Danish scientific study published Thursday.   “Penguin guano produces significantly high levels of nitrous oxide around their colonies,” said the head of the study, Professor Bo Elberling, of
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The word “raptor” conjures the image of sleek, fearsomely clawed dinosaurs stalking prey with wolf-like social intelligence. But that nail-biting Jurassic Park kitchen scene, which made these prehistoric creatures so memorable, keeps being foiled by new scientific evidence.   First, reptilian scales gave way to feathers (not to mention the noises they made in the
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We already know what a tough and hardy little creature the naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is, but it turns out these critters do have a weakness after all – they rely on high levels of carbon dioxide in their immediate environment, otherwise they have seizures.   While previous studies have already identified the animal’s ability
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A single tail from one of the largest and most enigmatic dinosaur species looks to have solved a longstanding mystery about these extinct creatures: whether they could swim. The discovery of a giant fossilised tail belonging to the theropod Spinosaurus aegyptiacus suggests these huge predators were aquatic animals after all, using tail-propelled locomotion to swim