Environment

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Slashing greenhouse gas emissions would probably not yield visible results until mid-century, researchers have said, cautioning that humanity must manage its expectations in the fight against global warming.   Even under optimistic scenarios in which carbon pollution falls sharply, climate change will continue for decades, they reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. “We need
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Global warming is turning clear mountain lakes green in the western United States because of an increase in algae blooms “without historical precedent”, researchers reported on Tuesday.   The concentration of algae in two remote mountain lakes more than doubled in the past 70 years, researchers at Colorado State University found. Their results, published in
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Wombats are among the most peculiar of animals. They look like a massively overgrown guinea pig with a boofy head, a waddling gait, squared-off butt, backwards-facing pouch and ever-growing molars.   Indeed, wombats are oddballs and don’t look much like their nearest living relatives, the koala. But koalas and wombats (collectively known as “vombatiformes”) are
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Dormant “zombie fires” scattered across the Arctic region – remnants of record blazes last year – may be coming to life after an unusually warm and dry spring, scientists warned Wednesday.   “We have seen satellite observations of active fires that hint that ‘zombie’ fires might have reignited,” said Mark Parrington, a senior scientist and wildfire expert
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Some of our weirdest and most wonderful species are likely next in line for the sixth mass extinction during the current human-fuelled crisis. From butt-breathing, punk-haired Mary River turtles (Elusor macrurus) to big-eyed aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) with their strange extra thumbs, our activities are decimating many remarkable living beings.   “These are some of the most
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Ocean heatwaves cause vast coral bleaching events almost every year due to climate change, threatening reefs around the world. The high water temperatures stress reef building corals, causing them to eject the photosynthetic algae that reside in their tissue.   Losing these brownish-coloured plant cells lets the coral’s white limestone skeleton shine through, turning reefs
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The next pandemic could come from the Amazon rainforest, warns Brazilian ecologist David Lapola, who says human encroachment on animals’ habitats – a likely culprit in the coronavirus outbreak – is soaring there because of rampant deforestation.   Researchers say the urbanization of once-wild areas contributes to the emergence of zoonotic diseases – those that