Eclipse 2018: How to watch Blood Moon live stream again | Science | News


A Blood Moon – widely used to refer to a total lunar eclipse – appears a gorgeous reddish hue due to being a fully eclipsed moon.

The Moon occurs when the moon blocks all direct sunlight from illuminating the moon’s surface – but some sunlight still reaches the lunar surface indirectly, painting the Moon in a rusty-red, yellow, or orange glow.

The total lunar eclipse took place yesterday on January 31, as sky-gazers witnessed a Blue Moon – the second full moon in a calendar month – orbiting closer to the Earth more than usual.

live streamed the three lunar phenomena – a Supermoon, a Blue Moon and a Blood Moon – as they rose in conjunction to create a special celestial event not seen since 1844,

The moon appeared 30 percent brighter and 14 percent bigger on Wednesday, forming a Supermoon.

The combination of the three moons created the spectacle of an enormous, rust-red moon seen from Australia, Asia, North America, Alaska and Hawaii.

Scroll below to see how to watch the 2018 NASA total lunar eclipse live stream again.

How to re-watch the total lunar eclipse live stream

Astronomy service, Slooh, started a live stream from 5.45am EST (10.45am GMT).

Live commentary from Slooh’s experts Paul Cox, Helen Avery, Paige Godfrey and Bob Berman began at 7am EST (12pm GMT).

Slooh live streamed the rare Blood Moon for the total five hours and 17 minutes of the eclipse and featured webcam footage from partners in Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand and Asia.

Following the end of the total lunar eclipse yesterday, Slooh also release a video of the whole five-hour live stream – so anyone who missed the spectacular event can watch the whole eclipse again.

Did NASA live stream the Blood Moon eclipse yesterday?

NASA broadcasted live images of the Super Blue Blood Moon 2018 phenomena, on NASA TV, live throughout Wednesday, January 31.

Viewers around the globe tuned in to the live webcast on @NASAMoon, NASA’s official lunar Twitter account.

The entire passage was expected to take more than four hours, with viewers checking in from as early as 5.30am EST (10.30am GMT) before the penumbral eclipse began and featured shots from different viewing points in western America.

Watch NASA’s live stream of the Blue Moon eclipse here

NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles and the University of Arizona’s Mt.Lemmon SkyCenter Observatory were the chosen locations to stream the super blue blood moon.

The lunar eclipse reached totality at 7.52am EST (12.52pm GMT) and lasted for one hour and 16 minutes.

The next 2018 total lunar eclipse will appear on July 27 to 28, 2018.

Much of Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, south in North America, South America, the Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, the Indian Ocean and Antarctica will experience the spectacle.



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